Eli and The Hot Six at Primavera Ristorante August 10, 2017

Phil Person trumpet, Ted Casher clarinet.tenor sax, Herb Gardner trombone, Bob Winter Keys, Jimmy Mazzy banjo/vocals, Eli Newberger leader/tuba, Bob Tamagni drums, Watson Reid vocals.

Primavera Ristorante is their Home Base, where they can bring friends and family, relax and have fun, and try new things.  They are an amiable group of very talented musicians who really enjoy each other’s company,  constantly improvising and challenging each other.

They kicked it off with an old war horse, Kid Ory’s Muskat Ramble, played with a bossa nova rhythm; powerhouse group of accomplished musicians!

Trumpeter with long white pony tail,

Phil Person

 

 

Then Eli featured individual members, beginning with a warm, muted trumpet presentation by Phil Person on Do Nothing ‘Till You Hear From Me.

 

 

 

Winter at keyboard

Bob Winter

 

 

 

Bob Winter dedicated a moving melody, Stars Fell on Alabama, to his brother and his wife who were visiting.

 

 

 

Herb on trombone

Herb Gardner

 

 

 

Herb Gardner came prepared,  singing and playing I Think You’re Wonderful,  showing his passion for this music.

 

Then the fun started.

 

Bob Winter also brought along his dentist, who just happened to play harmonica.  Mel Gluskin, who is a dentist in Brookline, Massachusetts, played a lovely medley of Moon River and Somewhere Over The Rainbow.   He said “Bob Winter gets a free cleaning.”

dentist

 

That reminded Jimmy of a tune filled with double entendre called Long John Blues:
“I got a dentist who’s over seven feet tall.
I have a dentist who’s over seven feet tall.
His name is Doctor Long John
And he answers every call.
.

I went to Long John’s office.
I said, “Doctor, the pain is killing.”
He said, “Don’t worry, baby.
It’s just your cavity needs a little filling.”

That’s enough.  Jimmy has all the verses memorized.

 

Vocalist Watson Reid was called on with a Fats Waller tune that featured a police siren – but without the siren:  This Joint is Jumpin’.

with full band behind him

Watson Reid

Staying upbeat, Washington and Lee Swing was wild.  Ted’s clarinet sounded like a 1700s  flute leading a charge of revolutionary soldiers.   Eli called for Bob Tamagni and Ted Casher  to trade fours, then  twos, then ones.  Ted’s clarinet antics made Bob break up!

We just caught the tumultuous ending…

It was hard to tell who was having the most fun – the band or the audience!
But it wasn’t over.

Ted returned on gut-wrenching tenor sax with one of our favorites, Blue Turning Gray Over You.  Coleman Hawkins, you’ve been replaced!

The Hot Six continued with a blistering instrumental, Rampart  Street Parade, that had everyone’s feet tapping.

The finale was approaching.  Already??  That was fast!

Eli was featured on a tuba solo that we haven’t heard in a long time.  Bob Winter backed him on keyboard as Eli’s tuba went, low, low, low, on Polka Dots and Moonbeams.

with Jimmy and Winter in the back

Eli Newberger

Touching  ending to an enjoyable evening!

They will be back next month.  We’re eagerly awaiting another amicable reunion when Eli and The Hot Six return with another dynamic evening September 21st, the 3rd Thursday of the month.  Join us??

Stan McDonald’s Blue Horizon Jazz Band at Primavera Ristorante August 3, 2017

7 pc trad jazz band

Stan McDonald’s Blue Horizon Jazz Band

Stan McDonald soprano sax, Gerry Gagnon trombone, Phil Person trumpet, Jack Soref guitar, Stu Gunn double bass, Richard Malcolm drums

The Blue Horizon Jazz Band was eager to play following a two-month hiatus at Primavera Ristorante.  They played many of our Traditional Jazz Favorites;  Gerry Gagnon, Stan McDonald and Phil Person carried the melody on front  line.  In Trad Jazz, somebody always plays the melody.

trombone, soprano sax, trumpet

Front Line: Gerry Gagnon, Stan McDonald, Phil Person

They were backed by rhythm section: Jack Soref on guitar, Rich Malcolm drums, and Stu Gunn acoustic double bass.  The front line played great ensemble backed by exemplary rhythm on Spreading Joy.

Stan on soprano sax

Stan McDonald, leader

 

 

 

Leader Stan McDonald was featured on Bechet’s Fantasy, and singing All By Myself.

 

 

 

 

Phil Person

 

 

 

Phil Person adds his own unique voice on trumpet with beautifully simple phrasing.

 

 

Rich tapping sticks attached to bass drum

Rich Malcolm

 

 

Rich Malcolm maintains that important Trad Beat with unique improvisations.  It’s a joy to watch his antics!

 

 

 

 

 

Jack on Django style guitar

Jack Soref

 

 

Jack’s D-hole guitar was specially built for him by a friend in Worcester, combining  several designs from various French guitars – sounding very much like Gypsy Jazz.

 

 

 

 

Stu Gun on acoustic double bass

Stu Gun on acoustic double bass

 

 

 

 

Stu Gunn also maintains the beat, in sync with the drum.  His solo on Memphis Blues expressed flawless intonation.

 

 

 

 

Gerry’s instrument is a 1946 Olds Super Trombone with wide tone band and hand engraved details.  He is equally adept on tuba and fills in when Stu can’t make it.

Gerry on trombone

Gerry Gagnon

Hand engraved trombone

Stan took a break after the second set.  The rhythm boys were featured on I Remember When.

drums, gita, bass

The Rhythm Boys: Rich Malcolm, Jack Soref, Stu Gunn

Then the 5-piece band took off with Sweet Sue, Chinatown, My Blue Heaven, Strutting with Some Barbecue, and Gerry singing The Sheikh of Araby.  They closed the evening with Coquette.

5 pc band, no sax

My Blue Heaven

Chinatown

Coquette – video by Ellen McDonald

Stan McDonald’s Blue Horizon Jazz Band plays at Primavera on the first Thursday of every month; they will return September 7th.   Join us!

TUNES:
Got Rhythm
Blue Turning Gray Over You
Roaming
My Gal Sal
Tijuana
Some Sweet Day
Bechet’s Fantasy
Spreading Joy
Lotus Blossom
Memphis Blues
All By Myself
I Remember When
Sweet Sue
Strutting with Some Barbecue
The Sheikh of Araby
My Blue Heaven
Coquette

Steve Taddeo & The Swing Senders July 27, 2017 at Primavera Ristorante, Millis MA

by Bill Falk

7-pc swing band

Steve Taddeo’s Swing Senders

Paul Monat Cornet & Trombone; Dan Gabel Trombone, John Clark Reeds; Ross Petot Piano; Bill Doyle Guitar; Jon Dreyer Bass; Caroline Griep Vocals; Steve Taddeo Drums.

This was Steve Taddeo front and center. The outstanding drummer romped through the evening with great solo after great solo. He drove the band through lots of fast paced numbers featuring improvisation by the individual members.

On Slingerland Drums

Steve Taddeo

John in blue shirt on clarinet

John Clark

 

 

 

John Clark held the band together with steady reed work. Plus, he soloed beautifully, especially on the Wabash Blues.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Don Gabel and Paul Monat were impressive on trombone duets – not something you see often.

 

 

I thought Bill Doyle on guitar paced the rhythm section while Jon Dreyer on bass was extremely consistent.

on 1938 guitar

Bill Doyle

playing double bass and smiling

Jon Dreyer

Ross Petot blended in well on piano and soloed well later in the program.

Ross playing stride on keyboard

Ross Petot

Caroline smiling and singing

Caroline Griep

 

 

Caroline Griep sang several old standards, but I thought she was somewhat overpowered by the power of the band – which nullified her effectiveness.

 

 

 

 

The band played driving versions of standards mostly, and they certainly shook the rafters with sound. However, I thought they produced a little too much noise which hurt the overall effectiveness of the group.

Steve Taddeo is marvelous and always puts on a great performance. This was no exception.  He is well worth the price of admission.

Avalon

 

Dan Gabel with white pants and vest and wing tips playing valve trombone

Dan Gabel on Vaughn Monroe’s valve trombone

 

 

Don Gabel told an interesting story about his valve trombone. The family of the late, great Vaughn Monroe presented it to him and told him to play it, not let it sit idle. Old timers may remember Monroe’s version of “Racing With The Moon.” It was a big hit nationally.

 

 

 

 

 

by Bill Falk

photos by Marce

For more about Dan Gabel and Vaughn Monroe, see the October 4-8 Calendar.

 

 

 

Eli and The Hot Six at Primavera Ristorante July 20, 2017

7-pc Traditional and Swing Band

Eli & The Hot Six

Bo Winiker trumpet/flugelhorn, Ted Casher clarinet/tenor and alto sax, Herb Gardner trombone, Bob Winter piano, Jim Mazzy banjo/vocals, Eli Newberger leader/tuba, Zac Casher drums, Elaine Wu, Watson Reid and Nat Coolidge vocals, Carolyn Newberger washboard

Eli and The Hot Six is composed of seasoned veterans with the wisdom and expertise gained from playing many, many gigs in a variety of venues.  They exhude rhythmic energy with delicate ornamentations — and  it’s always new, enriching and nourishing for your jazz soul.

Eli playing fancy tuba

Eli Newberger

 

Eli leads them with a subtle pointing and each has the courage to follow his impulse and makes the melody come alive.   His monstrous tuba becomes the rhythmic instrument that guides them.

Eli was the Tiger in Tiger Rag with swinging synergy inspired by the burning tempo. In the middle, Eli motioned to Bo and Bob, and they abruptly responded, trading two bars then one bar, at that fast tempo.  It was done seamlessly; amazing!

 

Bo on trumpet

Bo Winiker

 

Bo Winiker’s trumpet generally establishes the melody, but doesn’t always take the lead.   His ability to improvise seems limitless.

Bo created arrangements for this 7-piece band that made it sound like a full orchestra on Don’t Get Around Much Anymore and a
Duke Medley of
 Mood Indigo,
Sophisticated Lady
,
I’ve Got It Bad and That Ain’t Good,
with Ted switching to alto sax.

Clarinet master Ted Casher is also a full-blown tenor saxophonist with total command of the horn.  it was a revelation to hear him on alto.  His son Zac provided solid, swinging support every note of the way, with a loose touch that gets big sound.

Zac on drums, Ted on clarinet

Zac and Ted Casher, father and son team.

Bob Winter’s propulsive rhythms and fluent style were apparent on his unique version of Gershwin’s masterpiece Begin The Beguine.  He plays challenging music that only top musicians can meet.  He added so much!

Bob playing, Eli looking down with arms crossed, and smiling

Eli enjoying Bob’s surprises on keyboard

Herb on trombone

Herb Gardner

 

Herb Gardner’s supple fingers showed digital dexterity on trombone. He once said “Each trumpet player is different, and you change your lines to fit his style. Jazz is an exercise in manipulating music and it can be incredibly rewarding with these top players.”
Herb’s expertise was featured playing and singing on Nice Work If You Can Get It, and Let’s Misbehave, with a great drum solo by Zac.

 

 

 

Carolyn with eyes closed playing washboard with spoons

Carolyn Newberger – file photo

 

 

 

Carolyn Newberger added a little spice to the band with Miami Beach Rhumba on washboard, with  Bob Winter’s encouraging assistance.

 

 

 

 

Jim playing banjo, Zac in back

Jimmy Mazzy and Zac Casher

 

 

 

Jimmy’s one-note banjo and singing style are renowned.  He kicked off this evening with banjo and vocal on Basin St. Blues.

But he’s a busy guy, so the band has added several new vocalists.

 

 

 


Elaine Wu

 

 

Elaine Wu’s deep feeling takes us inside each song, making each composition tender or perky, treating us with many tunes, including one we’ve never heard before, I’m an Errand Girl for Rhythm, send me.

 

 

 

 

Watson with a big smile, holding a mic

Watson Reid

 

 

 

Watson Reid realy enjoys singing with this band, he’s a tasteful, swinging and inventive interpreter of Bill Bailey and Flat Foot Floogie

 

 

 

Nat in cowboy hat singing into mic

Nat Coolidge

 

 

 

Nat Coolidge gave a sweetly earnest performance on Summertime and You Do Something To Me – this was his first time with the band.

 

 

 

They finished with a fiery St. James Infirmary,  with Jimmy scatting it to a close.

Music is a powerful motivator.  Join them on Sunday and Monday presenting The Genius of Cole Porter Jul 23rd  8pm at Barrington Stage Company, 30 Union Street, Pittsfield, MA 01201; Box Office: 413 236-8888 and Duke Ellington Swings!  July 24 at 8:00 PM  $45  info@barringtonstageco.org

TUNES:

Basin St. Blues – Jimmy
12th St. Rag
Nice Work If You Can Get It – Herb
Begin The Beguine – Bob
I’ve Got You Under My Skin – Elaine
Tiger Rag – Eli
Summertime – Nat
Bill Bailey – Watson
Miami Beach Rhumba – Carolyn
Don’t Get Around Much Anymore
Ellington Medley:
Mood Indigo
Sophisticated Lady
I’ve Got It Bad and That Ain’t Good
Errand Boy (Girl) – Elaine
Let’s Misbehave – Herb
Route 66 – Elaine
Flat Foot Floogie – Watson
You Do Something To Me – Nat
Saint James Infirmary Blues – Jimmy
Limehouse Blues

Eli and the Hot Six at Primavera Ristorante June 15, 2017

6 pc swing band, no banjo

Eli and The Hot Six

Bo Winiker trumpet, Ted Casher alto and tenor sax/clarinet, Herb Gardner trombone, Eli Newberger tuba/leader, Bob Tamagni drum, Elaine Wu and Watson Reid and guest Sarah (Gardner) Nova vocals

Skill and stamina – the musicians arrived early and practiced for two hours, then played for us from 7-9:30pm – preparing for their two-day Jazz presentation of The Genius of Cole Porter and Duke Ellington Swings!  at Barrington Stage Company, Pittsfield, MA July 23 and 24. Tonight we had all Duke Ellington!!  Who doesn’t LOVE Duke Ellington?

There were great solos from all the deeply skilled musicians, tasty notes, long and coherent phrases that reflected the story of the genre, the songs, and their individual contributions.

clarinet, trumpet, trombone

Front Line – Ted Casher, Bo Winiker, Herb Gardner

Elaine singing Watson with a big smile

Elaine Wu and Watson Reid are now retired physicians, very relaxed and delighted to be singing full time.

They played some well-known Ellington tunes, starting with In a Mellow Tone, Mood Indigo, Sophisticated Lady; and some not-so-well-known, Elaine singing Never Trust Your Heart.

pert young singer

 

 

Guest Sarah Nova sang Shuffle Boogie and her own composition of Keep Your Hands Off It.

 

 

 

Don’t Get Around Much Anymore was WILD with Eli on tuba solo and Bo on flugelhorn.

 

Ted on alto sax

 

 

We always enjoy Ted Casher’s tenor sax, but this was the first time we’ve heard him on alto.  He said “it plays in the wrong keys”.

 

 

 

 

Bob drumming with eyes closed, making a determined face

 

 

Drummer Bob Tamagni took a solo In Flat Foot Floogie where we could hear the melody elaborated rhythmically, which makes it ever so engaging.  Great vocal by Watson Reid.

 

 

 

Winter at keyboard

Bob Winter

 

 

Limehouse Blues was played at a good clip.  Bob Winter played the melody rested in great chords, some expected, some not.

 

 

 

 

 

Herb played a  solo like a young man with vim and vigor!  Yet again the drummer played the melody, getting such a range of sounds on just a snare, bass and hi-hat.  Eli sent those ripping riffs to the stars as he always has and we know he will continue to do so with such gusto.

I’m Beginning to See The Light, Take the A Train, Write Myself a Letter, Day Dream. Watson did his special version of Bill Bailey Won’t You Please Come Home.

Three birthdays were celebrated:  pianist Bob Winter, Marce, and Sarah Abramson.  We all shared a delicious birthday cake brought in by Jeannine James.  This was Sarah’s first time here – she loves tuba; Eli gave her a Happy Birthday solo right at her table.  She was enthralled!

at Mrs. Abramson's table

Eli plays Happy Birthday

Marce wants especially to thank two very special ladies who took time out from their busy schedule to be here for this occasion, Music Therapist Kathleen Howland and vocalist Sarah (Gardner) Nova.

….and Marce’s family, with three grandsons:

all standing for picture

Jason Towne, Marce, DJ Sardonini (from Florida) and his friend Sarah, Brian Towne.

It was a memorable evening for all of us!

Folks in Pittsfield MA are in for a treat when Eli & The Hot Six present The Genius of Cole Porter July 23rd and Duke Ellington Swings!  July 24th 8pm at Barrington Stage Company, 30 Union Street, Pittsfield, MA 01201    info@barringtonstageco.org  Box Office: (413) 236-8888.

Marce and Kathleen

Dan Levinson and The Swing Senders at Bemis Hall, June 17, 2017

Dan Levinson and The Swing Senders at Bemis Hall
Dan Levinson, Tom Ferrante, John Clark reeds; Jeff Hughes trumpet, Paul Monat cornet, Gerry Gagnon trombone, Ross Petot piano, Bill Doyle guitar, Justin Meyer bass, Steve Taddeo drums, and…

Caroline holding mic and smiling

Caroline Griep

 

 

Caroline Griep vocals.

 

 

 

 

Dan Levinson returned to Bemis Hall with the Swing Senders for a fine afternoon of great music, produced by Steve Taddeo.  We’ll let Harold McAleer’s videos show how great it was……

Caroline sings Out of Nowhere

At one point, we had the Taddeo Trio with Dan, Ross and Steve:

China Boy

 

Fine and Dandy Taddio Trio

And a surprise Happy Birthday to Me – with three saxophones!

Finale – Crazy Rhythm, Taddeo drum solo:

The musicians still played their heart out despite the small crowd.   Besides Fathers’ Day, there was a lot happening this week.

Mark your calendars – Steve will be bringing more fine musicians to Bemis Hall, 15 Bedford Rd. Lincoln, MA.  Please join us in supporting this fine Jazz and Swing!


August 13, Sun. 2-4pm The Big Four
with The Midiri Brothers with Jeff Barnhart piano/vocals, Steve Taddeo drums and Caroline Griep. FREE

October 11, Wed. 7:30-9pm Sarah Spencer and her Transatlantic All Stars, Sarah Spencer saxophone, Jeff Hughes cornet, John Clark reeds, Herb Gardner piano, Justin Meyer bass, Jimmy Mazzy banjo, Bill Doyle guitar, Gerry Gagnon trombone and Steve Taddeo drums  FREE

 

Blue Horizon Jazz Band at Primavera Ristorante May 4, 2017

Stan McDonald soprano sax, Phil Person trumpet, John Kafalas trombone, Gerry Gagnon tuba, Jack Soref guitar, Rich Malcolm drums.

The Blue Horizon Jazz Band played fine Classic Traditional Jazz at Primavera Ristorante on May 4th.  Stan McDonald dug into his massive collection of Traditional Jazz and provided charts for the musicians, bringing us great tunes the band hasn’t played in a long time.

McDonald in front playing soprano sax, Gagnon behind him with huge tuba

Stan McDonald and Gerry Gagnon

 

Stan McDonald led on soprano sax, Stan plays with the taste and inflection and inspiration of Bechet.  Gerry Gagnon’s  turbo-charged tuba played booming bass lines.  Gerry is the longest continuous band member, 23 years.  Initially he played tuba, later switched to trombone.  A master of both instruments, he plays tuba when bass player Stu Gunn is away and the band has a reunion with John Kafalas on trombone.

 

 

 

 

Kafalas with trombone extended almost to floor

John Kafalas

 

 

John Kafalas’s trombone improvised counterpoint harmony lines to the sax and trumpet.  John remembered the intro to “Farewell to Storeyville” perfectly from when he was a full-time member of the band years ago.  It was good to hear that tune again!  The band was glad when John moved back to New England.

 

 

 

Two Videos of Blue Horizon Jazz Band with John Kafalas by the late George Borgman:
Featured in this video are band leader Stan McDonald, the leader switches between the soprano saxophone and the clarinet, longtime member Walter Miller on trumpet, Hans Brack on bass, John Kafalas on trombone & double-bell euphonium, John Rayworth on banjo, Stu Grover on drums and Phil Hower on the piano. – Recorded at the July Fourth “Jazz Picnic” 1989.

My Creole Belle

You Do Something To Me

Back to 2017………..

Phil Person blowing trumpet

Phil Person

 

 

 

Phil Person’s purity of tone reinforced the melody and lifted the whole band.  He gave us a moving solo on “I Remember When.”

 

 

 

 

Rich with both sticks on snare drum

Rich Malcolm

 

 

Rich Malcolm’s drums maintained the Classic New Orleans Street Beat that is so essential to Traditional Jazz.  He played for the Sox at Fenway the night before!  He was well warmed up for tonight!

 

 

 

 

Jack looking at chart playing guitar

Jack Soref

 

 

Jack Soref played two solos.  First a Django inspired “It Had To Be You.”  Second a spellbinding “Dark Eyes.   Youngest member of the band, he appreciates Stan McDonald’s depth and knowledge about the musicians of the 20’s and 30’s.

 

 

 

A special request altered the second set.  “Marjorie” was celebrating her 89th birthday in the dining room and kept peeking in on the music.  Finally she came into the music room with her daughter, son-in-law and 2 grandsons.  The band played a lively version of “Margie” as a birthday present.  The entire family danced energetically with Marjorie to everybody’s enjoyment

The whole band played a memorable, hard-driving  performance!  There are only a few bands still playing New Orleans Traditional Jazz;  Stan McDonald’s Blue Horizon Jazz Band perseveres at Primavera on the first Thursday of every month.  Please join us at 7pm on June 1st  at 20 Pleasant St. Millis MA?

Tunes this evening were:  June Night, Four or Five Times, All of Me, I’ll Never Be The Same, Rosetta, Running Wild, My Gal Rocks Me, Some of  These Days, Blues in the Air, When I Leave the World Behind, Roaming,  Rose of the Rio Grande, I Remember When, After You’ve Gone, Farewell to Storyville, Margie.

Eli and The Hot Six at Primavera Ristorante, March 16, 2017

7 piece contemporary classic jazz band

Eli and The Hot Six: Bo Winiker trumpet/flugelhorn, Ted Casher clarinet/tenor sax, Herb Gardner trombone, Bob Winter keys, Jimmy Mazzy banjo/vocals, Eli Newberger leader/tuba, Bob Tamagni drums, Elaine Wu and Watson Reid vocals.

(by Marce. Click on pictures to see enlargements.)

The Hot Six play contemporary, classic jazz, joining the present with the glorious past. They kicked it off with sparkling spontaneity on At The Jazz Band Ball, a tune by Nick LaRocca, cornetist with the Original Dixieland Jazz Band.  (They were the first to record a commercial jazz recording 100 years ago.)

Tiny Elaine looking up at Watson, both singing their hearts out

Elaine Wu and Watson Reid

 

 

Vocalists Watson Reid and Elaine Wu (two doctors, no waiting)  came up complaining about the weather with Baby, It’s Cold Outside.  

 

 

We never get enough of the heartfelt Jimmy Mazzy vocals and unique one-string banjo,  tonight singing You’re Nobody Sweetheart Now and There’ll Be Some Changes Made.

Jimmy with Eli and Tamagni

The Amazing Jimmy Mazzy – one of a kind – and we have him here!

Elaine singing, left hand up in the air, Ted on tenor sax

Elaine Wu with Ted Casher

 

Elaine sang Lullaby of Birdland with Ted backing her on tenor sax.  She also graced us with  I’ve Got You Under My Skin, and I’ve Got The World on a String – and she does.  She’ll be retiring from Medicine soon and singing full time!

 

 

 

Bob completely absorbed in playing keyboard

Bob Winter

 

 

 

Bob winter gets absorbed in Irving Berlin’s How Deep is the Ocean. He creates soaring melodies with much musical sophistication.

 

 

 

drummer has stick crossed above the snare drum, making a weird face

 

 

 

Ultra-tight all-star assembly on The Sheik of Araby, propelled by Bob Tamagni’s drumming.

 

Eli on antique engraved tuba

Eli Newberger

 

 

 

They continued with one of our favorites, Limehouse Blues.

Bob began it with an incredible piano intro, then a Herb & Bo duet moved it to double time, Bob Winter was amazing, backing them using only his left hand.

Eli added fine tuba solo.

Waitress holds cake while she blows out candles

Jeannine is surprised with a birthday cake.

 

 

 

 

Overtime, the Fans here have become one big Family.  Tonight there was a birthday cake for ‘regular’ Jeannine James.  It was a complete surprise.

 

 

 

Bo holding handkerchief and smiling like Louis Armstrong

Bo Winiker plays Louis. Sings in his own voice, not imitating Louis.

 

 

We welcomed Bo Winiker back with his powerful trumpet.  He grew up in Millis and many of his friends were here to welcome him back.  He dedicated Louis’s Wonderful World to the Harkey family.

 

 

 

Herb playing trombone with Ted on clarinet

Herb Gardner, back from playing hot spots in NY.

 

 

Herb was featured singing and playing You’re Driving Me Crazy,  nobody plays trombone like Herb Gardner!

 

 

 

A smiing Carolyn with Eli and Tamagni in back

Caroline’s flying spoons on washboard.

 

 

Carolyn Newberger joined the band with a rousing  Washboard Roundolay.

 

 

 

 

smiling and singing into mic

Watson Reid

 

 

Watson Reid surprised is with the complete verses of Bill Baily.  There were so many, we didn’t even recognize the song until the band started the chorus.

With ensemble backing him he also entertained us with Don’t Get Around Much Anymore.

 

 

 

When this infectious music gets to your feet, you can’t sit still!  Six of us just had to get up and dance!

6 women dancing in a circle

We just couldn’t sit still!!  This was so much fun!                              Photo by Harkey.

eyes closed, concentrating on playing

Ted on gut-wrenching tenor sax

 

 

 

Ted Casher played Blue and Sentimental with marvelous subtones on gut-wrenching tenor sax   Thank you, Ted!

 

 

 

Bo took over with an Ellington tune,  Do Nothing ‘Till You Hear From Me, with smokey flugelhorn.   Bob Winter was asked to play something.   He surprised us with Angry, creating chordal subtleties and melodies. The Hot Six closed this delightful evening with Ida, published in 1903.

There is nothing like this anywhere else; we had such fun! This music is so uplifting; weeks later we were still glowing.  They will be back here April 20th.  Join us!

Dan Gabel’s Centennial Jass Band, March 30, 2017  Primavera Ristorante

6 musicians standing in black tux and bow ties

Dan Gabel’s Centennial Jass Band

Dan ‘Daddy’ Gabel – 1912 King Trombone, Cow Moos
Jeff ‘LaRocca’ Hughes – 1910 Conn Cornet, Horse Whinny
John ‘Shields’ Clark – Clarinet and Rooster Coos
Ian ‘Rags’ Frenkel – Piano and fashion consultant
Bill ‘Sbarbaro’ Reynolds – 1915 Snare drum, traps (no hi-hat), barn sound effects
Rick ‘Robinson’ MacWilliams – Tuba and President


Many Traditional and Dixieland Jazz Bands across the world this month are celebrating the Original Dixieland Jazz Band recording the first commercially issued jazz 100 years ago!  We had our own version Thursday Night at Primavera Ristorante in Millis, MA with Dan Gabel’s Tribute to the  #OriginalDixielandJassBand.

Jeff Hughes, John Clark and Dan Gabel have played together in many bands, but tonight they morphed into cornetist  Nick LaRocca, clarinetist Larry Shields and trombonist Eddie Edwards.

6 musicians all sitting and playing, no banjo

Front Line: John Clark, Jeff Hughes, Dan Gable

They played all ODJB tunes, starting, of course, with the Original Dixieland One Step.  I thought I’d died and gone to heaven!

It continued with Livery Stable Blues, that became the first jazz single ever issued.  It has the barnyard animal sounds that Gunther Schuller called “Barnyard Hocum.”

seated, playing clarinet

John Clark

 

John Clark was dynamite on Clarinet Marmalade.  John is leader of the popular Wolverine Jazz Band, and arranging and composing tunes of his own.

Larry Shields  co-wrote the ODJB classics Clarinet Marmalade with Henry Ragas, which became one of the landmark compositions of early jazz and was a very popular jazz standard in the 1920s. He also co-wrote At the Jazz Band Ball, Ostrich Walk, and Fidgety Feet.

 

 

Dan’s Centennial Jass Band made Ostrich Walk into a polyphonic thriller!
Singing The Blues is usually associated with Bix Beiderbecke, but the ODJB were the first to play it.  They went to London in the 1919, where they played I’m Forever Blowing Bubbles.

This was the first time the musicians had ever played these arrangements together; the intensity grew as they absorbed the techniques.

Fidgety Feet was a Hot One!

Till My Daddy Comes Home, front line trading fours.

Alice Blue Gown started out as a waltz, but not for long – second chorus turned into hot toe-tapping Dixieland.

Rick sitting playing tuba, eyes looking up at ceiling

Rick MacWilliams

 

Downtown Strutters Ball has been played by just about every band, but they played faster than usual.  Nice tuba by Rick MacWilliams.

(The ODJB didn’t have a tuba so Rick was given the title of  “President” of the band.)

 

 

 

Bill with just bass drum, 1915 snare, and one smaller drum and 3 cymbals. No hi hat.

Bill Reynolds

 

 

 

Drummer Bill Reynolds (Tony Sbarbaro)
knows his Trad Jazz beat and kept the band in perfect time on cymbals and a 1915 snare drum, using the same simple drum set they had back then. No hi hat.

 

 

Ian with huge hands playing keyboard, huge reach on fingers

Ian Frenkel

 

Astounding playing by Ian (Henry Ragas) on Syncopation Rag, with his wide finger spread. This was recorded by Benny Goodman in his Carnegie Hall Concert.

You can listen to Ian Frenkel on a real piano on Soundcloud – https://soundcloud.com/search/sounds?q=ian%20frenkel

 

 

John Clark sang When You and I Were Young Maggie.  He dedicated it to his #1 Fan, 90+ year-old Betty Weaver, who is a regular at Primavera, as she was at The Sherborn Inn and Sticky Wicket.  She talked John Clark into singing years ago.

St. Louis Blues – 

 

standing In tux with long tail in back, holding trombone and singing his heart out

 

 

 

Dan Gable sang Pardon Me, Pretty Baby,  resplendent leader in long-tailed tux and two-toned shoes.

Jeff Hughes’s Dad’s favorite was the 1919 Tell Me.  Piano and cornet took first chorus; what a sweet cornet!

Dan Gable added some fancy crooning – he first heard it on a Bill Crosby recording.

 

 

 

Jeff with elbows out aiming cornet straight at the crowd.

Jeff Hughes

 

 

Jeff Hughes was in his element on a 1910 Conn Cornet.

He has a vast collection of cornets and trumpets, and leads many bands of his own.
Tops in our book!

 

 

 

The ODJB had Jim Robinson on piano for the 1920 Broadway Rose. It was issued on Victor 18722 A.

They closed this breathtaking evening with a fierce trombone Tiger on Tiger Rag.

New Orleans music is a living, breathing organism.  We sincerely hope Dan Gable keeps this Centennial Jass Band playing long after the celebrating is over!

5 musicians in black tuxes

The Original Dixieland Jazz Band

Riverboat Stompers at Primavera Ristorante February 16, 2017

Jazz Sea Cruise – January 1-19, 2018    Phone 352.205.1777  Fax: 352.415.0779

7 piece Traditional Jazz Band

Riverboat Stompers

The Riverboat Stompers with guest Craig Ball performed peppy renditions of New Orleans favorites  at Primavera Ristorante, with Craig Ball (cl), Neil Flewelling (ct), Frank Batchelor (tb), Steve Taddeo (dr), Phil Hower (p), Pierre Lemieux (tu), and Eric Baldwin (bj)

by Marce, videos by Pierre Lemieux

They began with Original Dixieland Jazz Band One Step,  celebrating The ODJB’s recording of Jazz for the first time 100 years ago!

both singing wildly

Neil and Frank filling in for Steve Straus.

 

Leader Steve Strauss was on temporary disability, so Frank Batchelor led the band and Neil and Frank took turns doing the vocals, having fun with You Took Advantage of Me.  I Can’t Give You Anything But Love.

 

 

 

Phil at keyboard, smiling at camera

Phil Hower

 

Phill Hower introduced Rose of Washington Square. (He’s the only one who knows the verses.) Phil’s heroes are the great stride pianists of the 1920’s and ’30’s, and he emulates their techniques and style. with a strongly rhythmic left hand.

Frank did the vocal, Phil in absolute rapture on keyboard.   Eric Baldwin took this solo on guitar

 

 

The theme from This Old House, Louisiana Fairy Tale is always a favorite!

Pierre playing tuba

Pierre Lemieux

 

Bei Mir Bis Du Schoen –  Eric moved to  banjo. Excellent solos all around, including Pierre Lemieux’s tuba.  Pierre maintains that Trad Jazz beat in many bands!

Phil Hower and Pierre Lemieux have been with the Riverboat Stompers band since its inception in 1990.

 

 

Bei Mir Bis Du Schon  (To me you are Beautiful)

Somebody Stole My Gal was WILD with Craig Ball clarinet.  The high ferver continued with Coney Island Washboard Roundelay.

drum and clarinet

Steve Taddeo and Craig Ball

Steve Taddeo’s drumming was tasteful and appropriate, evoking Baby Dodds behind the soloists.  He added an excellent drum roll solo on Floating Down to Cotton Town.

Eric on banjo with Phil keyboard in the back

Eric Baldwin

 

 

 

We’ve been listening to Eric Baldwin play guitar for many years, but we really enjoyed Eric’s banjo playing!

 

 

 

Frank using hand for mute on trombone

Frank Batchelor

 

 

 

Frank Batchelor sang It’s a Sin to Tell a Lie, followed by fine band ensemble.

 
Muskrat Ramble

Phil started Sweet Lorraine; he knows ALL the verses.  Eric returned to guitar;   Neil took the lead, calling out the time for an upbeat Ain’t She Sweet.

clarinet and trombone pointing to Neil seated and playing cornet

Fine front line

Neil on cornet

Neil Flewellen

 

 

Neil playing a superb Sleepy Time Down South. Neil has been heard playing both in the Dixieland-style and swing all across New England.

 

 

 

 

He took the vocal on Bill Bailey, Please Come Home.

 

They closed with a relatively new tune, Moonlight.  Steve Straus will be back with this Powerhouse Group at Primavera March 23rd and ….

NOTE THIS! The band will be taking its first Jazz Cruise January 5-19 on the Holland America Caribbean Dixieland Jazz Cruise, with Bob Schulz Frisco Jazz, New Orleans Nighthawks, & Grand Dominion, and more!
Join them…  Phone 352.205.1777  Fax: 352.415.0779
 Dixieland Jazz Sea Cruises